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Author: Larry Ebner Published: June 15th, 2020 Larry Ebner, founder of Capital Appellate Advocacy PLLC in Washington, D.C., handles appeals and writes amicus briefs in cases throughout the United States that involve the federal government or federal law. He interviewed digital marketing expert Nick Kosar about how lawyers can use LinkedIn to promote

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Author: Larry Ebner Published: March 24th, 2020 Larry Ebner, founder of Capital Appellate Advocacy PLLC in Washington, D.C., handles appeals and writes amicus briefs in cases throughout the United States that involve the federal government or federal law. In this “digital roundtable” discussion, Larry asks INBLF President Arnie Lutzker and DC Chapter President

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Author: Larry Ebner Published: April 29th, 2020 Larry Ebner, founder of Capital Appellate Advocacy PLLC in Washington, D.C., handles appeals and writes amicus briefs in cases throughout the United States that involve the federal government or federal law. In this article, Larry explains that communicating effectively via email with clients, colleagues, and other

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Mulcahy, James M.
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Antitrust lawyers well know that price discrimination claims under the Robinson-Patman Act (RPA) can be very difficult to win. For example, going as far back as 1953, the SupremeCourt has held that there is no buyer liability under Section 2(f) unless the plaintiff (the disfavored buyer) can show the defendant

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Mulcahy, James M.
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In the antitrust context, a “rimless wheel” – or “hub-and-spoke” – conspiracy is not a general conspiracy but instead amounts to multiple conspiracies between the common defendant – e.g., a distributor – and each of the other defendants – e.g., multiple suppliers. This means that, absent allegations establishing a “rim” between

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Mulcahy, James M.
mulcahy

Thirty-five years ago, the California Supreme Court held that vertical price fixing is per se unlawful under California’s antitrust statute. 1 Since then, however, modern economic analysis and federal antitrust jurisprudence have evolved dramatically away from the antiquated common law “restraints on alienation” approach to per se condemnation. For the

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